Something New from Doc Sketchy

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Prunesquallor
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Prunesquallor » Thu May 14, 2020 4:39 am

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Fri May 01, 2020 1:22 am
The other day, when I was taping that QFG video, I thought to myself, "Boy, I wish I had another one of these 1U Dual VCAs" so tonight I built another one. Here are some pictures of the two almost identical beauties, side by side. I put yellow and purple knobs on the new one. I also did a much nicer job on the stooge bracket. I used exactly the same wire colours on all the connectors, to make it easy to wire up.
VCAsFront.jpeg VCAsBack.jpeg
Kewl! I take it these are derived from the Intellijel Quad VCA?

Just a thought - have you considered putting the stuff you're offering up on Modular Grid? It's not that I need more GAS ( :help: ), but I hadn't thought about those VCAs, and presumably you offer VCOs as well?
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Thu May 14, 2020 1:38 pm

Prunesquallor wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 4:39 am
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Fri May 01, 2020 1:22 am
The other day, when I was taping that QFG video, I thought to myself, "Boy, I wish I had another one of these 1U Dual VCAs" so tonight I built another one. Here are some pictures of the two almost identical beauties, side by side. I put yellow and purple knobs on the new one. I also did a much nicer job on the stooge bracket. I used exactly the same wire colours on all the connectors, to make it easy to wire up.
VCAsFront.jpeg VCAsBack.jpeg
Kewl! I take it these are derived from the Intellijel Quad VCA?
It's actually based on the uVCA, which was the first dual unit which I designed. The Quad VCA is basically just two uVCAs with some output normaling and boost switches (as far as I know -- by that time I had more or less stopped working with Intellijel, and I've never made it a secret that I don't use eurorack gear personally).
Just a thought - have you considered putting the stuff you're offering up on Modular Grid? It's not that I need more GAS ( :help: ), but I hadn't thought about those VCAs, and presumably you offer VCOs as well?
I hadn't really thought about it, because I'm not totally prepared to act on it if orders start flooding in. However, I'm happy to sell units on an individual basis, particularly of stuff that I've built a lot of (such as these dual VCAs, and my new-and-improved version of the CGS analog shift register, and the "Dixie on steroids" VCO that I favor for my own personal use, and my multiplying modulator, which is awesome and now comes in a dual unit with voltage-controlled Quadrant and built in dual Squish, or the really awesome Dr. Octature filter, which is still my go-to filter for every patch).

Stuff like this QFG is a little bit complicated to offer as a "product" for the masses at this point. This build took me three evenings to achieve, not counting the troubleshooting. Now, of course, both your unit in 4U and this unit in 5U were "prototypes" (yours especially) where the unit is sort of being redesigned as it is being built and tested (like how I abandoned the first Panel Board of your build with the clunky physical 4PDT Quadrature Mode switches, and adopted the SPDT + DG333 option instead). My 5U unit is more or less based on your 4U unit (the Circuit Boards are very similar except that the 5U is an inch wider so it accommodates more interconnections and I cleaned up some annoying little cosmetic layout issues, the middle Expander-circuitry section of the Translator Board is very similar but the translation traces are all different, and significantly simpler and more elegant, again because of the extra inch of width, and of course the Panel Board is completely different). If I could just flat-out "build" a completely perfected design of the QFG, and not have to worry about finding layout mistakes, etc., then this build would take 2 evenings, including testing. I could handle that.

There is one thing in my 5U QFG that I really have to address before offering a "product" -- the EOC LEDs are free-flying, and that is a real nuisance, because, how do you stick them down to the panel? What I did was pretty shocking: I plugged the LEDs into 2-pin female crimp-pin connectors and bent the LEDs wires around the back of the connector to hold it in firmly. However, I bent the LED at a 90-degree angle to the connector so that when it sticks through the panel hole, the connector sits flush on the back of the panel. Then, because each LED was located directly above the gap between two tightly-spaced Switchcraft jacks, I was able to screw wood-screws between the jack bodies to hold the 2-pin connectors tight against the back of the panel. The LEDs are thus firmly stuck in their holes.

For an actual product that I would feel comfortable selling, I would have to use PCB-mounted jacks, and I would put all the bottom 20 jacks and those 4 EOC LEDs on a separate PCB (or extend the length of the Translator Board to encompass the jacks, because I believe it is at just about the correct height, and this can be adjusted a little bit by changing the lengths of the pins on the back, but this would make assembly somewhat inconvenient) -- the LED leads would be pretty long, because the jacks are long, but I could insulate them with heat shrink or with some salvaged insulation from solid core wire to keep them from touching each other. Hence, at least one more "prototype" of this unit will have to be built before I am comfortable just selling it for a fixed price to Wigglers.
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Moog$FooL$ » Thu May 14, 2020 4:54 pm

"I hadn't really thought about it, because I'm not totally prepared to act on it if orders start flooding in."

simple..... just get a "good buddy" or two, to help u!! :razz:
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Fri May 15, 2020 12:17 am

Moog$FooL$ wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 4:54 pm
"I hadn't really thought about it, because I'm not totally prepared to act on it if orders start flooding in."

simple..... just get a "good buddy" or two, to help u!! :razz:
That's a very good idea... now if I could only think of who that might be...?
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Fri May 15, 2020 12:38 am

Today I successfully troubleshot the QFG -- other than two minor layout issues on the Panel Board, there were three solder bridges causing all my problems. I was very happy about the last one -- I looked at the output of the faulty device and deduced exactly where the solder bridge had to be, and there it was! That was pretty gratifying. Anyway, it all works perfectly now -- I even changed those four resistors so the attack is now nicely curvy in exponential mode.

Anyway, here's the finished module, with rainbow knobs. This is easily the nicest thing I've ever built, and it's less than 2" deep in the back -- skiff friendly! No more stooge brackets!!!!!!!!! I'm super happy with this whole "Translator Board" concept. It gives me the freedom to lay out Circuit Boards in the most electronically rational way (and laying out this one was a breeze -- that was probably the easiest part, laying out the Circuit Board), and lay out Panel Boards in the most esthetically pleasing way, and the two can be plugged into each other easily.
15_Finished_QPG.jpeg
So, I'll be offering these for sale for the low, low price of $500 US + shipping costs -- for now, 5U format only (although I may be persuaded to build another one in 4U). Just PM me if you are interested.
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Prunesquallor » Fri May 15, 2020 1:28 am

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 1:38 pm
It's actually based on the uVCA, which was the first dual unit which I designed. The Quad VCA is basically just two uVCAs with some output normaling and boost switches (as far as I know -- by that time I had more or less stopped working with Intellijel, and I've never made it a secret that I don't use eurorack gear personally).
:tu:
Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 1:38 pm
I hadn't really thought about it, because I'm not totally prepared to act on it if orders start flooding in. However, I'm happy to sell units on an individual basis, particularly of stuff that I've built a lot of (such as these dual VCAs, and my new-and-improved version of the CGS analog shift register, and the "Dixie on steroids" VCO that I favor for my own personal use, and my multiplying modulator, which is awesome and now comes in a dual unit with voltage-controlled Quadrant and built in dual Squish, or the really awesome Dr. Octature filter, which is still my go-to filter for every patch).
Ha! Good point! Although I see a superfriend has already offered to help. ;)

Could you tell us more about the Dixie on steroids and post a piccie? What does it have over the IJ Dixie II+? I did some reading about your Doc Ock; it sounds a beast! Very Serge-like in its patch programmability. Did you add any extras to that? Taps for multimode? Anything from the planned expander?

All great stuff! Maybe a Sketchy Labs voice panel is in my future... 8-)
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Sat May 16, 2020 1:50 pm

Prunesquallor wrote:
Fri May 15, 2020 1:28 am
Ha! Good point! Although I see a superfriend has already offered to help. ;)
Yes, that's Moog$FooL$ and he's a very good friend indeed. He is a "dab hand" at electronics and repair, and we have discussed going into some sort of business together for a while. We'd like to start building handmade monosynths in nice wooden cases, but I'm not sure what the market for such beasts would be given the recent activities of Mr Behringer.
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Prunesquallor » Sat May 16, 2020 2:47 pm

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Sat May 16, 2020 1:50 pm
Prunesquallor wrote:
Fri May 15, 2020 1:28 am
Ha! Good point! Although I see a superfriend has already offered to help. ;)
Yes, that's Moog$FooL$ and he's a very good friend indeed. He is a "dab hand" at electronics and repair, and we have discussed going into some sort of business together for a while. We'd like to start building handmade monosynths in nice wooden cases, but I'm not sure what the market for such beasts would be given the recent activities of Mr Behringer.
Well, I take it you wouldn't be producing knock-off clones for impoverised students. :-) It'd be a different market for high-quality, original designs.

Back to your oscs and filter... any deets at all?
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Sat May 16, 2020 5:19 pm

Here is a pic of my latest Dixie build:
DIYDixie.jpg
Basically, this is a Dixie with all the waveforms (but none of the through-zero stuff) of the Rubicon. So, it's got:

- Pots: Coarse, Fine, Lin FM, Exp FM, Phase Width, PWM, and Flip Sync Amount.
- Switches: VCO/LFO, Sine Type (Sine, Sigmoid, 2x Sigmoid), Pulse Type (Centre pulse, Edge pulse, 2x Edge pulse), Suboscillator (1 Oct down, 2 Oct down), and Flip Sync (Flip Once, Flip Twice -- I'll explain that later).
- Jack inputs: 1V/Oct, Exp FM, Flip (Sync), (Reset) Sync, PWM, Lin FM
- Jack Outputs: Pulse, Square (Pulse fixed at 50% duty cycle), Suboctave, ZigZag, Sine, Triangle, Saw, 2x Saw

Here is the Dr Octature filter. It's a four-pole cascaded stage filter (Roland style) with 8 outputs, and it has special circuitry to boost the signal at high resonance (a problem with Roland-style filters) and to give uniform 10Vpp sine waves during self-oscillation. This makes it particularly useful as a sine LFO. I originally designed this filter as a response to the Mankato filter, which is more or less the same thing, but doesn't have the boost capability and achieves uniform sine waves with post-filter amplifiers. (My circuit uses in-filter amplifiers to both amplify the outputs and boost the signal internally, which gives the perfect amount of boost for beefing up the signal at high resonance.)

This isn't my "best" version of the Doc Oc build -- I actually sold my best one to another Wiggler a few years ago -- this one is the one I had built before that one -- in fact, this module is probably 10 years old -- it is one of my oldest modules. My preferred build has a switch for switching the Boost in and out. Sometimes one might want that wimpy Roland sound, for authenticity purposes. I would also prefer a "VCF/LFO" frequency range switch to give better control ranges for each purpose, and maybe a Clipping switch for adding some distortion (like the Intellijel unit, although I typically don't use distortion myself). Also, I'd probably throw some LEDs on the outputs, just for shits and giggles.
DocOc.jpg
This particular filter has the following features:

- A three-input mixer, with unfiltered mixer output, and controls for each channel and the overall mix.
- 8 filter outputs with sine waves at 45-degree phase offsets when self-oscillating
- Coarse and Fine frequency controls
- VC Resonance
- Two FM controls -- one monopolar (which I use for LFO inputs) and one bipolar (which I use for EG inputs)
- A sine limiter control -- this will adjust the sine waves from 10Vpp to 20Vpp during self-oscillation

Without the mixer and/or the sine limiter, this could easily be built in 2U. However, I really like having a three-input mixer on this filter, since I don't have any other mixers, and it's a convenient place to have one because I like having multiple inputs on filters.

OK, I just decided, I'm gonna rebuild this filter using a Panel Board, etc, and put on all the improvements.
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Prunesquallor » Sun May 17, 2020 3:44 am

Ha! What've I made you do? :hihi: Thanks for all this. Now gotta think...

Just as a by-the-way, how close can you get the Doc Oc to sound like the JP6 filter? That's always been my favourite Roland.
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Sun May 17, 2020 3:50 pm

Prunesquallor wrote:
Sun May 17, 2020 3:44 am
Ha! What've I made you do? :hihi: Thanks for all this. Now gotta think...

Just as a by-the-way, how close can you get the Doc Oc to sound like the JP6 filter? That's always been my favourite Roland.
Not sure, but if you want a JP6 filter, I could probably just build you one. Looking at the schematics, it doesn't look like anything too complicated.
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Prunesquallor » Mon May 18, 2020 2:30 am

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Sun May 17, 2020 3:50 pm
Prunesquallor wrote:
Sun May 17, 2020 3:44 am
Ha! What've I made you do? :hihi: Thanks for all this. Now gotta think...

Just as a by-the-way, how close can you get the Doc Oc to sound like the JP6 filter? That's always been my favourite Roland.
Not sure, but if you want a JP6 filter, I could probably just build you one. Looking at the schematics, it doesn't look like anything too complicated.
:party: Cheers, Doc. I'll be in touch again at some point.
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Mon May 25, 2020 1:54 pm

Here's the new 5U Dr. Octature filter I built using my new Panel+Translator+Circuit Board format. This one still has wired jacks, but I've convinced Steve at Small Bear to carry the PCB-mounted version of the jacks I like (the wired ones are Switchcraft 112AX, while the new PCB-mounted ones are 112APCX). He should be getting 1000 of those in within the next few days, at which point I will order a whole bunch and modify this module to have PCB-mounted jacks and LEDs. That will eliminate every single wire from this module.

Again, I plan to sell these to anyone who wants one. I'm still thinking about the price, but it will probably be around $300 US.

Once again, I apologize for the very crappy quality of this video. I was actually in the process of making a video for my new 5U Quad Function Generator (the beautiful 5U version of the one I built in 4U Serge format for Prunesquallor), and ended up making a Doc Oc video instead. I'll post the QFG video after I get those new jacks and update the build, because I really want to show it totally wireless.

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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by synkrotron » Mon May 25, 2020 4:22 pm

Impressive sounding filter :)

And an impressive build too. I'll check out through this post to find out how you get those great looking front panels.

I am pretty green when it comes to this kind of stuff. So I am not familiar with the Intellijel unit.


cheers

andy

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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Prunesquallor » Tue May 26, 2020 4:59 am

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Mon May 25, 2020 1:54 pm
Here's the new 5U Dr. Octature filter I built using my new Panel+Translator+Circuit Board format. This one still has wired jacks, but I've convinced Steve at Small Bear to carry the PCB-mounted version of the jacks I like (the wired ones are Switchcraft 112AX, while the new PCB-mounted ones are 112APCX). He should be getting 1000 of those in within the next few days, at which point I will order a whole bunch and modify this module to have PCB-mounted jacks and LEDs. That will eliminate every single wire from this module.

Again, I plan to sell these to anyone who wants one. I'm still thinking about the price, but it will probably be around $300 US.

Once again, I apologize for the very crappy quality of this video. I was actually in the process of making a video for my new 5U Quad Function Generator (the beautiful 5U version of the one I built in 4U Serge format for Prunesquallor), and ended up making a Doc Oc video instead. I'll post the QFG video after I get those new jacks and update the build, because I really want to show it totally wireless.

Impressive, Dave!
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Tue May 26, 2020 3:34 pm

synkrotron wrote:
Mon May 25, 2020 4:22 pm
Impressive sounding filter :)

And an impressive build too. I'll check out through this post to find out how you get those great looking front panels.

I am pretty green when it comes to this kind of stuff. So I am not familiar with the Intellijel unit.


cheers

andy
Thanks for all the kind words, Andy!

The panel was made thus:

I have my local "Metal Supermarket" in Richmond, BC cut an 8.75" strip off the end of a sheet of 0.080" thick aluminum 6061, then cut that 4' long strip into a number of pieces of width 7" (4U), 5.25" (3U), 3.5" (2U) and 1.75" (1U), calculating the total to minimize waste. The cost is about $2 per U. This particular build used a 3U panel blank.

Next, I design the front panel on Front Panel Designer, which is a free software that you can download from Front Panel Express. I set up the panel as if it were to be powder-coated in Traffic White. I create a User Grid in the program to 0.1" and place all components (which are basically just holes) on that grid. That makes it a snap to lay out the Panel PCB in Excel later. Then, after the entire panel is exactly the way I want it, I group everything together and mirror it horizontally relative to the middle of the panel. This creates a mirror image of the panel for printing.

Next, I print the panel out on standard Lazertran paper for laserjet printers. First I cut the Lazertran to the width I need, taking care to minimize waste (cuz that shit's expensive! -- like $3 or $4 per sheet). I tape the Lazertran strip onto the middle of a piece of standard letter paper and place it on the top of the paper tray. Then I print the panel onto the Lazertran backwards (mirror-imaged). This is because when you bake the Lazertran onto the panel blank, you want the printed graphics to be between the plastic sheet and the metal, and not on top of the sheet. This renders the graphics more or less indestructible.

The next step after printing is to go over the entire printed Lazertran sheet thoroughly with a hot air gun (which is like a hair dryer on steroids), being careful not to actually melt the Lazertran, but coming damn close. This step is very important. Failure to do this step will give you bubbly messed up graphics on the finished panel (learned that the hard way).

Next, I thoroughly clean the business side of the panel blank with soap and water. Some people sand the panel, but I like to leave the original finish intact. Usually, the metal sheet will have a protective sticker on it, which needs to be peeled off. Any residual adhesive from the sticker should first be removed with acetone before giving the panel its final wash. Once the panel is thoroughly washed and rinsed (and any rough edges smoothed with steel wool), I submerge it into a tub of tap water.

Next, put the printed and heat-treated Lazertran sheet into the water. It will curl up into a tube. Let it sit in the water for a couple of minutes. Then carefully unfurl it, place it printed side down on the panel blank and very gently and carefully remove the wet paper backing, leaving the very delicate 15-micron thick plastic sheet on the panel blank. Then remove the panel from the water, very carefully slide the Lazertran plastic into its final position (the corner mounting holes help with this), put it under running tap water and use your index finger to gently rub all over the plastic, which squeegees it down and also rubs the Lazertran adhesive off of the plastic (remember, we are applying the Lazertran upsidedown, and it has an adhesive backing which must be rubbed off, or it turns brown during baking) and finally use a silicone kitchen spatula to gently squeegee the water from underneath the plastic. After the Lazertran is firmly down on the aluminum, I gently dry it with a folded up paper towl.

Now comes the tricky part -- baking. This is the part which must be done perfectly right. Here's what I do. I have a small Kitchen Aid toaster oven:
kitchenaidoven.jpg
which I bought second-hand for $75. I use this for my panel bakes. First, I turn it on and set it to Bake and Warm with the oven door open. I place the panel on the middle rack and cover it with the baking pan upside-down. I don't expose the panel directly to the heating element of the oven. Then I bake for 20 minutes on Warm with the oven door open. This is just to gently dry the panel. Here is the baking schedule I use:

20 minutes: Warm with oven door open
20 minutes: Warm with oven door closed
20 minutes: 200F
20 minutes: 250F
20 minutes: 300F
20 minutes: 350F
20 minutes: 400F
Turn oven off and open door. Let panel cool in oven for an hour.

So, the entire bake takes 2 hours and 20 minutes, plus an hour for cooling. I have found, by trial and much error, that this is the magic formula for getting perfect baked-on Lazertran panels. The first 20 minutes with the oven door open is the most important thing. If the oven door is closed right away, the panel will get too hot before it is completely dry and will not turn out very well. I try to organize things so that I have other stuff to do in Sketchy Lab while the panel is baking. Since the oven is in Sketchy Lab, and I'm timing it on my phone, I can sit there and solder circuits and shit, getting up every 20 minutes to adjust the oven. I never look at the panel while its baking -- wouldn't want to jinx it!

After the panel is baked and cool, it must be drilled. The first thing I do is sit down at my bench with a small hammer and a centre punch, and I punch small divots into the centre of each component hole. I just do this by eyeballing it -- it's close enough. Then I use a 1/8" drill bit to drill a small guide divot on each hole, using the centre punched holes as guides. These little 1/8" divots guide the larger drill bits. This step is very important for getting precision hole placements.

For components, I use 1/8" for 3mm LEDs, 3/16" for corner mounting holes, 1/4" for toggle switches, and 3/8" for both Switchcraft jacks and those nice PCB-mounted 12-mm Alpha pots I get from Small Bear. If I use 24-mm non-PCB-mounted Alpha pots, I use 5/16" for those. I also deburr both the fronts and backs of each hole. For the 1/8" holes I use the 3/16" bit to very carefully deburr. For the larger holes I use the deburring tool:
deburringtool.jpg
This gives nice holes with no rough edges.

So, basically, this is a 5U version of the Intellijel Dr. Octature II (which has been discontinued, along with most of my original designs). Here is a decent little video:

I designed all of the Intellijel filters -- Dr. Octature (and Atlantis), Korgasmatron (and Morgasmatron), uVCF, and Polaris. Of all these, Dr. Octature is still my favorite, for general creaminess and four-pole goodness.
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by synkrotron » Tue May 26, 2020 4:07 pm

Wow! That is quite a process! You obviously have this process nailed now. Sounds quite daunting for an absolute newcomer. And sounds expensive, until you see what companies are charging for custom panels.

If I thought I was going to be making many modules myself I would look further into this kind of thing. As it is I will have to be content with plain aluminium panels that I write on. Another option may be to get a panel engraved and filled with an epoxy two part "ink." My son's friend is into CNC stuff but I have yet to make that connection.

Regarding holes... I'm a mess... I should at least get a drill stand. That panel I posted in the other topic was hand marked, punched and drilled and looks bad after that first glance. My son has a quite a large pillar drill and he only lives six miles away, but we are all observing the "social distancing" thing here so I am left to my own rather inadequate shed at the bottom of the garden.

Thank you for the detailed write-up... I read every word :tu:

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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by synkrotron » Tue May 26, 2020 4:10 pm

Dr. Sketch-n-Etch wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 3:34 pm
I designed all of the Intellijel filters -- Dr. Octature (and Atlantis), Korgasmatron (and Morgasmatron), uVCF, and Polaris. Of all these, Dr. Octature is still my favorite, for general creaminess and four-pole goodness.
Ah, I see, I didn't know that. I'm still relatively new here :)

That is, indeed, a great sounding filter. Thanks for the video :tu:

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Eric the Red
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Eric the Red » Tue May 26, 2020 11:50 pm

synkrotron wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 4:07 pm
Wow! That is quite a process! You obviously have this process nailed now. Sounds quite daunting for an absolute newcomer. And sounds expensive, until you see what companies are charging for custom panels.
I make my own panels, and got the PP. (Price per MU) down to a few bucks. I buy blank aluminum panels, design the graphics in Illustrator, and then get them printed on a vinyl sheet. Comes in like a big sticker.

I stick it on the panel, drill the holes, and attach everything.

-Eric

Here’s what they look like: viewtopic.php?f=17&t=204737&p=2879849&h ... l#p2879849
Abandon all hope, ye who wiggle.

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synkrotron
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by synkrotron » Wed May 27, 2020 5:02 am

Eric the Red wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 11:50 pm
I make my own panels, and got the PP. (Price per MU) down to a few bucks. I buy blank aluminum panels, design the graphics in Illustrator, and then get them printed on a vinyl sheet. Comes in like a big sticker.

I stick it on the panel, drill the holes, and attach everything.

-Eric

Here’s what they look like: viewtopic.php?f=17&t=204737&p=2879849&h ... l#p2879849
Hi Eric, thanks for that, it looks quite interesting.

I was thinking something similar but using photo paper instead of vinyl and gluing it onto a panel I may still try that.

Panel wise, once the current lockdown situation eases in the UK I will be making a trip to my local B&Q which appears to stock 2mm thick aluminium strip in various widths to suit Eurorack HP4 to HP8. That will be a lot easier than what I am doing at the moment which is hand cutting panels from a bit a aluminium sheet I have knocking around.

cheers

andy

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Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Fri May 29, 2020 2:16 am

Eric the Red, your panels look great! I've thought about doing it that way, but the Lazertran thing is working for me pretty well now. It was a lot of trial and error, and occasionally I still screw one up, but mostly it works pretty well.

As far as holes, buy yourself a drill press (and a decent set of bits)! I got my first one, a Ryobi, for $107 US at Home Depot in 2010, and drilled probably about a million holes with it over 10 years. I replaced it with a King Canada model last year for $165 Canadian (I think). I sold the old one on Craigslist for $25 -- it had a broken pulley -- the slowest speed broke off, but four of the five speeds were still usable -- I mostly just wanted to get it out of the garage, and the guy who bought it was ecstatic. So, that was the best net $90 I've ever spent, I think. The King Canada is much quieter and nicer to use, although the Ryobi was easier to change the speed because the belt was loosened or tightened with an Allen screw attached to the motor. The KC one has these phony-baloney thumb screws on either side, and to tighten the belt you've got to put something like a big screwdriver between the motor and the drill press body and yar on it while tightening the stupid thumbscrews. Luckily it doesn't really need to be very tight to work well, but that could have been designed a whole lot better. However, I can listen to music while using the KC, while the Ryobi was so noisy that I couldn't. That's important when you stand at the drill press for hours on end drilling 1000s of tiny holes in PCBs.
A dewdrop can exalt us like the music of the sun.

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Dr. Sketch-n-Etch
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Dr. Sketch-n-Etch » Fri May 29, 2020 2:20 am

So, tomorrow I'm going to build my new Frequency Shifter in 2U MOTM format. I've got all the PCBs laid out (except the Panel PCB, which I'll finish tomorrow). I'm not going to go full Translator with this one. It has four circuit boards that stack up, and each one has just a few connectors on the edges, to connect to the panel or to each other. I'll just use MTA-100 headers -- it shouldn't take more than an hour or so to wire up. Hopefully I'll be able to make a short video in a coupla days. I built an earlier prototype on a slab of plywood a coupla years ago and it worked well -- Moog$FooL$ came over and we played my electric guitar through it -- it was pretty freaky! I even made a video, but it's shite and has one or two offensive things on it that I wouldn't want to publish on YouTube. In any case, the new version will be very slick.
A dewdrop can exalt us like the music of the sun.

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KSS
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by KSS » Fri May 29, 2020 12:25 pm

Hooray here too!

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Prunesquallor
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by Prunesquallor » Fri May 29, 2020 1:36 pm

Frequency shifter? You have my attention! Is it a riff off existing designs, or something you've cooked up yourself? :hyper:
If at first you don't succeed read the instruction manual.

RIP Ziggy, the companion in my avatar.

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KSS
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Re: Something New from Doc Sketchy

Post by KSS » Fri May 29, 2020 3:02 pm

He teased about it over a year ago. It's his own thing. Which is a very good thing!

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