MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index
 FAQ & Terms of UseFAQ & Terms Of Use   Wiggler RadioMW Radio   Muff Wiggler TwitterTwitter   Support the site @ PatreonPatreon 
 SearchSearch   RegisterSign up   Log inLog in 
WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

What's the difference between a trigger and a gate?
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Modular Synth General Discussion  
Author What's the difference between a trigger and a gate?
matthewsavant
seriously, i just don't get it I've searched around and have found no definitive answer to this.
As far I don't get the difference...If I was to connect the gate out of a midi/cv module to the trigger in of any EG it will trigger the env..but on the Blue lantern noise/utility module one of the functions is a 'gate to trigger converter' What would be the purpose of this? hmmm.....
Adam-V
A trigger is usually a short pulse that occurs at the start of a key press on a keyboard or start of a step on a sequencer. A gate usually stays on for the duration of the key press or sequencer step. Most of the sequencers I've experienced will output a continuous gate signal for adjacent steps rather than a gate pulse per step.

The purpose of the gate to trigger converter would be to provide a trigger from any gate source that may not necessarily already provide one thus allowing use of other signals as trigger sources (clock dividers for example).

Cheers,
Adam-V
matthewsavant
Makes perfect sense now
thanks!
VortexRanger
For many functions triggers and gates are more or less interchangeable. Lots of inputs are just looking for a rising edge, which can come from either triggers or gates.

My introduction to gates was in keyboard terms, for firing ADSR envelopes. As I got further into modular specifically, for a long time I focused mostly on triggers for clocking AD envelopes, pinging LPGs, sending to clock dividers etc., thinking of gates as basic stuff and less versatile.

Lately I've been getting more into gates in general. If you're dealing with logic functions, comparators, certain types of track & hold or analog shift registers, etc. gates are indispensable and can get you into some territory you might not've explored before. Those are all things I'd never even really heard of before I got deep into modular. I've been using a Flip Flop alongside my clock dividers to make sure I always have variable length gates alongside the stream of triggers, and my patching has really come more alive as a result. thumbs up
negativspace
The short answer is "length." A very short gate is a trigger; a very long trigger is a gate.
Kodama
On a related note, which modules actually need a trigger instead of a gate? All of my modules work fine with either. seriously, i just don't get it
infradead
Kodama wrote:
On a related note, which modules actually need a trigger instead of a gate? All of my modules work fine with either. seriously, i just don't get it


depends. Dinsync DrumDokta will play drum sounds as long as your input. So a 10ms trigger sounds totally different than a 30ms gate.
Timetable also outputs the same as the input.
daverj
There are lots of trigger inputs that will trigger fine from a gate. But the other way around isn't the case. Since a trigger is very short it doesn't last long enough to act as a gate in places where a gate is really needed (such as a VCA, ADSR, or LPG).
VortexRanger
I often combine triggers with an OR combiner (Low-Gain Shortbus in my case). When getting into nitty gritty teeny tiny rhythmic stuff in that use, I find triggers are preferable because longer gates will just keep the output constantly high. Of course sometimes a little combination is good. 8)
swiv
VortexRanger wrote:
I often combine triggers with an OR combiner (Low-Gain Shortbus in my case). When getting into nitty gritty teeny tiny rhythmic stuff in that use, I find triggers are preferable because longer gates will just keep the output constantly high. Of course sometimes a little combination is good. 8)


Is there a compact euro gate to trigger converter around? I have this issue quite a bit now as well, I'd love a low hp gate to trig converter with four converters and 8 jacks, or something like that.

I found this but would love a finished module or a full kit:

http://www.cgs.synth.net/modules/cgs24_gatetotrigger.html

thumbs up
negativspace
The A-162 is a great trig/gate delay/converter. It's not so compact, being a dual unit in 8hp, but it's a very underrated module.
JRock
AniModule Quad Comparator can be used as a Gate-Trigger Converter
(among other things) thumbs up
emdot_ambient
CGS also sells an inexpensive, easy to build dual gate-trigger converter.

What needs a trigger instead of a gate really varies. I know some of my old gear (like the ARP AXXE and some NOS CEM ADSRs I'm building) use primarily gates, but they use triggers to initiate a retrigger of the envelope when the gate is already being held open. A short pulse causes the envelope to go through its cycle again. Most new stuff I've seen generally only really needs a rising edge, be that a gate or a pulse wave...but as stated above to trigger and hold, you need a gate.

And the DIY world really, really needs a good trigger sequencer project!
Modorange
Don't minimoogs, micromoogs Moog modulars, and other early Moogs use Triggers? So if you wanted to fire a note up to a minimoog from another unit that provides a gate out, you'd need the gate/trigger converter, and the cable with a cinch-jones plug on one end and a 1/4", 3.5mm or 1/8" plug on the other, correct?
nigel
Modorange wrote:
Don't minimoogs, micromoogs Moog modulars, and other early Moogs use Triggers? So if you wanted to fire a note up to a minimoog from another unit that provides a gate out, you'd need the gate/trigger converter, and the cable with a cinch-jones plug on one end and a 1/4", 3.5mm or 1/8" plug on the other, correct?

Same word, different meaning. The Moog S-Trigger is a gate as described above, and lasts for the length of a keypress (or a sequencer step, or whatever). However it is electrically a different kind of signal to the usual modular gate, which is why it needs to be converted.
elodin
I have a somewhat related question:

Does a trigger have to have close to 0 attack time (square) or will a slower attack like a triange also work? Or is it dependent on the receiving module (no standard)?
authorless
elodin wrote:
I have a somewhat related question:

Does a trigger have to have close to 0 attack time (square) or will a slower attack like a triange also work? Or is it dependent on the receiving module (no standard)?


It is going to depend on the module. Some are edge-triggered (most on the rising edge), some just trigger at a specific level.
cornutt
I think of it this way: The falling edge of a gate means something. It's the key being released, or the switch being turned off, or a time interval expiring, or whatever. The falling edge of a trigger doesn't mean anything -- it just has to reset for the next rising edge.
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Modular Synth General Discussion  
Page 1 of 1
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group