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WIGGLING 'LITE' IN GUEST MODE

Favorite Oscilloscopes
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Modular Synth General Discussion  
Author Favorite Oscilloscopes
phasebash
Greetings Fellow Wigglers.

What are your opinions regarding oscilloscopes and modulars? What are your favorite analog and digital oscilloscopes?

Ideally, basic trigger, measurement, and mathematical options would be available.
Just me
Whatever I have on hand. It's low freq audio, anything will work well.
paults
In order:

Tektronix TAS models. This is what I use every day for last 12 years or so.

Tek: 22xx series (2215, 2235, etc). Really nice big screens, very lightweight.

Tek:24xx series. Mother of All Analog Scopes. Tek 2465B is the most over-the-top analog design in last 30 years. Big heavy, and a bit noisy fans (but can get newer better ones). 400MHz full analog bandwidth with measurements. But a *true* 400MHz probe will cost you $400-$600. So use cheap $29 50MHz ones. When new, these scopes were around $20,000 but can get on eBay for ~ $700.

Not a big fan of digital scopes, when I need one I use a USB non-display one from a Dutch company valled TiePie.
mckenic
Might not be for everyone but I have to say again how happy I am with my Xprotolabs mini scope!
Hopefully there will be one with a slightly larger screen - something that would fit into 8HP would be cool!

sduck
I like the 21$ one I scored on ebay. 25Mhz Heath. Works great.
Cat-A-Tonic
I like that I can easily throw my MFB Videoscope up on the 32" TV.
It's the modular-oscilloscope equivalent of a Nintendo Famicom.

rockin' the living room studio.

disclaimer: 'rockin' may be construed as 'geeking out'

I really want to get an analog scope without a grid that does the XY*Z* thing for those wild vector scanning videos.
Man-Machine
Recommendations for an accurate and reliable software oscilloscope?
schmidtc
Tektronix 500 and 7000 series.
CJ Miller
I bought a Tektronix 2215 with all the manuals, accessories, probes. It is in great shape. I was not able to really afford it at the time because of bills - but bought it anyway for $200 because I knew I'd need it and the price was good. This and the "Best of CGS" panels have nearly killed me, financially, because I bought them at a really inconvenient time. Hopefully I will still have a house to enjoy them in!
ezekiel
I got a GW Instek GDS-1062A a few months ago. I am happy with it.

It is digital, goes way higher frequency than needed for audio. It is dual channel plus trigger and has math functions including a usable real-time FFT. Like all $300-500 range digital scopes, it is low graphic resolution, so it doesn't have the crisp vector graphics line of an analog scope (of course). It has a fan noise that is like a computer fan noise--but only noticed if the room is quiet (probably not when making synth noise!) The user interface is pretty easy to navigate.

The Rigel seem a popular alternative. The Owon and ATTEN models were possible choices. To be honest, I chose the Instek because the others were older models--I figured the Instek would be more up-to-date. I think I was correct.

I use this for DIY synth electronics with microcontrollers. Works well.

If you just want to see an analog waveform on a screen, the DSO Nano seems like it is making a lot of people happy for much less money.

If you are making commercial synth modules, you probably need to spend more and get the next step up in accuracy/resolution from Tektronics or similar.

And, used does offer some tempting options. As long as you have a way to ensure it works and can be calibrated for you.
ezekiel
I should point out that before I got a "real" oscilloscope, Audacity (or similar good audio software) can capture waveforms for your viewing pleasure. I did a lot with that, even dual channel ("stereo left and right"), but eventually realized I need more for microcontrollers. Also, the 20Hz-20KHz range (or less) can be limiting when viewing waves that have past through a soundcard input to your computer.
no-fi
I really didn't like digital scopes until I got one of the tek DPO series (got the DPO2024 at work a year or so ago) finally a digital scope that doesn't act like crap with a dynamic signal. A bit much $$$$ for hobby use at the moment, but worth keeping an eye out for 2nd hand in the future. I love this scope.

as for analogue CROs: +1 on the tek 22xx scopes, they're really good. Have used a few in my time and they're always welcome to be around.


I own a philips 100 MHz scope that I paid $200ish for, and for the money it's good once you get used to the control layout. I bought it after waiting for months for a good 22xx to show up for a decent price near where I lived, but none appeared, and I really needed a cro....
jimmyambulance
anybody using anything like this: http://www.sparkfun.com/products/10244

it looks perfect for what i would use it for, but i'm not sure if i'm missing anything crucial about features i'd need. help?
phasebash
That DSO Nano looks totally awesome, and I love the price. To be honest, this is probably all I need right now, which is simply the ability to monitor how different patches effect the resulting waveform.

Anyone have a DSO Nano who can vouch for their quality?
richard
phasebash wrote:
That DSO Nano looks totally awesome, and I love the price. To be honest, this is probably all I need right now, which is simply the ability to monitor how different patches effect the resulting waveform.

Anyone have a DSO Nano who can vouch for their quality?


if you like interfaces that are tiny and fiddly and horrible to use its perfect. I hated mine and couldn't wait to get rid of it
davidh
I have a Pikoscop, vintage, compact and nice, cheap
ok for checking waves, XY possibilities
you can find it easilly on ebay.de


http://www.radiomuseum.org/r/radio_fema_picoskop_eo17.html

phasebash
That also looks good. I would prefer something easy to use, which is the entire point of spending healthy coin on a dedicated oscilloscope.

What about the Rigol lineup? http://www.rigolna.com/products/digital-oscilloscopes/

They're cheap.
bf
I have a Tektronix 454 I picked up on cl from a guy who was building guitar pedals. I use it more on the bench than just to look at waveforms while I'm wiggling. It has fulfilled my needs, but is the only scope I have used so I may just not know any better.
j9k
Most people overlook the probes when getting a used scope. an uncompensated cable can introduce reflections and the scope won't give you an accurate picture of what your circuit is doing. Make sure your probes bandwidth is at or more than your scope
therefore
Really like the idea of an oscilloscope like the MFB Videoscope that actually runs on the display of your choice. Any others worth looking at that do this? Any in the US?
AT
as far as digital goes, the one that comes with cuemix motu software is very well integrated and easy to use.
deastman
paults wrote:

Tek:24xx series. Mother of All Analog Scopes. Tek 2465B is the most over-the-top analog design in last 30 years. Big heavy, and a bit noisy fans (but can get newer better ones). 400MHz full analog bandwidth with measurements. But a *true* 400MHz probe will cost you $400-$600. So use cheap $29 50MHz ones. When new, these scopes were around $20,000 but can get on eBay for ~ $700.
Paul, this might come off sounding a bit strange, but how can you tell which rev 2465 you have?
pulplogic
You can often find analog Kenwood and Hitachi scopes in great condition. It's harder to find a Tek scope that hasn't been ridden hard. I guess it's because they have been kept in service in real work environments for so long.

I found this Kenwood CS-1021 from the late 80's practically new in box.

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