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Erica Synths Double Bass
MUFF WIGGLER Forum Index -> Eurorack Modules  
Author Erica Synths Double Bass
versipellis


Vid was just posted a couple of days ago, looks interesting, but maybe a bit too big for what it does?
mrtweed
Hidden_Path
Interesting... seems like a bit of an offshoot of the Black VCO Expander module.
dbeats
Is this basically a frequency divider /2 and /4 plus a vc mixer and vc LPF?
milkyjoe
dbeats wrote:
Is this basically a frequency divider /2 and /4 plus a vc mixer and vc LPF?


thats what it seems to me . Also, i must be going deaf because its not what i consider bass.

Dont get me wrong, erica synths has some good stuff. Just not getting this one yet.
dbeats
Does it output square waves, regardless of input waveform? Probably yes, but can't find that info anywhere.
dannyF
shouldn't this be based on sine waves?

I just got this and am not liking the square shape of the 'bass'.
NoLegs
Seems to me this kind of module usually outputs squarewaves
dannyF
NoLegs wrote:
Seems to me this kind of module usually outputs squarewaves


why is that? shouldn't it be sine waves or maybe a combination of sine and square?

this is the first module I've purchased that I'm not immediately taken with. doesn't really sound bassy, more fuzzy.... may be sending it back.
Fog Door
I actually think it sounds really good from watching the demo. Possibly just doesn't suit your purposes? To be fair, I could put it to good use but I would still only get this if I had HP to burn!
NoLegs
dannyF wrote:
NoLegs wrote:
Seems to me this kind of module usually outputs squarewaves


why is that? shouldn't it be sine waves or maybe a combination of sine and square?

this is the first module I've purchased that I'm not immediately taken with. doesn't really sound bassy, more fuzzy.... may be sending it back.


Why do I think this? Anecdotally, most sub oscillators that I've seen in synthesizers (both eurorack and hardware synths) are square based.

Why are they designed this way? I have no idea. I'm sure there's a reason for it, either practically or from an electrical engineering perspective.

With all that said, I see that it has a LP filter on onboard, couldn't you use that to filter the square wave down to the fundamental pitch, essentially giving you close to a sine wave?
hinterlands303
dannyF wrote:
NoLegs wrote:
Seems to me this kind of module usually outputs squarewaves


why is that? shouldn't it be sine waves or maybe a combination of sine and square?

this is the first module I've purchased that I'm not immediately taken with. doesn't really sound bassy, more fuzzy.... may be sending it back.


As was mentioned in the other thread, most analog sub-oscillators are based on logic chips which output square waves. It's essentially a frequency/clock divider. I know one oscillator which will also output a saw sub-oscillator (WMD/SSF Spectrum) but I'm not sure what goes into the wave shaping circuit on that.

If you want a tight sine sub-oscillator (meaning not from a separate oscillator tuned an octave down from your first oscillator) you could use a rectifier on a saw wave output, which would double the frequency, and then mix it with the sine output (which would now be an octave down than the rectified saw). Just an idea.
dannyF
Quote:
If you want a tight sine sub-oscillator (meaning not from a separate oscillator tuned an octave down from your first oscillator) you could use a rectifier on a saw wave output, which would double the frequency, and then mix it with the sine output (which would now be an octave down than the rectified saw). Just an idea.


Could you expand on this idea? Not following it completely.
cptnal
dannyF wrote:
Quote:
If you want a tight sine sub-oscillator (meaning not from a separate oscillator tuned an octave down from your first oscillator) you could use a rectifier on a saw wave output, which would double the frequency, and then mix it with the sine output (which would now be an octave down than the rectified saw). Just an idea.


Could you expand on this idea? Not following it completely.


If I may...

Imagine chopping a saw wave at the point where it crosses 0V, then lifting the negative half into the positive range. You now have two saw points for every cycle, i.e. double the frequency. If you drop your oscillator by one octave you now have a saw at the original frequency and a sine one octave down. (We're assuming your oscillator has simultaneous saw and sine outputs.)
hinterlands303
cptnal wrote:
dannyF wrote:
Quote:
If you want a tight sine sub-oscillator (meaning not from a separate oscillator tuned an octave down from your first oscillator) you could use a rectifier on a saw wave output, which would double the frequency, and then mix it with the sine output (which would now be an octave down than the rectified saw). Just an idea.


Could you expand on this idea? Not following it completely.


If I may...

Imagine chopping a saw wave at the point where it crosses 0V, then lifting the negative half into the positive range. You now have two saw points for every cycle, i.e. double the frequency. If you drop your oscillator by one octave you now have a saw at the original frequency and a sine one octave down. (We're assuming your oscillator has simultaneous saw and sine outputs.)


Yes that's what I meant. Thanks for explaining it better than I did!
darmklacht@gmail.com
Got me a double bass, I like the Idea...

Not sure if mine works properly though...

At feeding it higher pitches all is fine...

But when I send it lower pitches (still well within in the audio frequency) it starts to misbehave.

With sawtooths the -2 octave is only -1 octave and the - 1 octave is just a narrow pulse at the same frequency as the input signal.

With a square or sinewave input the -1 and -2 are both -1 octave.

can anyone share if they are experiencing the same? has it just been made for relatively high frequency inputs? or is mine a bit faulty?

Thanks,
darmklacht@gmail.com
Well I offered this same question to the fine people at Erica.

Apperantly the module has trouble with some signals under 300hz.

Here are the exact words I´ve been told:


Yes, something like this is possible for the -2 suboscillator, when you give a signal which is about 300Hz. It depends on the waveform you give to the Double Bass module. If it’s first overtone has really high amplitude then at that moment the Double Bass may “think” that this overtone is the fundamental frequency.
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